WENERBURG

 
 
 
Wenerburg
WENERBURG

We hear about Lilou’s first banana split | John talks about psychotherapy.

John: Let’s talk food. I call this photo Wenerburg, which basically is a bad translation of Vänersborg, a Swedish city south of Lake Vänern in Sweden. Tell me a little about this Chinese restaurant you photographed.

Lilou: I had my first fried banana there, when I was a tiny girl, and it was instant love.

John: It must have been wonderful. Can you still remember the taste?

Lilou: No, but I have learned to make them myself, with vanilla ice cream and some powdered cinnamon on top. You’re not a huge fan of them are you, not like me?

John: No, I think they are too sweet, but I can eat one once in a while, so you get a chance to eat them too.

Lilou: Perhaps I like the memory associated with them more than the actual taste.

John: Interesting, do you think taste is more memory that people normally think, like the madeleine biscuit in Marcel Proust’s novel “Remembrance of Things Past”?

Lilou: Yeah. The same as with fears.

John: Fears are based in memory? Does that mean that a person can lose his or her fears if he or she deals with the memories associated with it?

Lilou: Of course. I believe you know that better than I do.

John: You may have a point there.

 

We hear about Lilou’s first banana split | John talks about psychotherapy.

John: Let’s talk food. I call this photo Wenerburg, which basically is a bad translation of Vänersborg, a Swedish city south of Lake Vänern in Sweden. Tell me a little about this Chinese restaurant you photographed.

Lilou: I had my first fried banana there, when I was a tiny girl, and it was instant love.

John: It must have been wonderful. Can you still remember the taste?

Lilou: No, but I have learned to make them myself, with vanilla ice cream and some powdered cinnamon on top. You’re not a huge fan of them are you, not like me?

John: No, I think they are too sweet, but I can eat one once in a while, so you get a chance to eat them too.

Lilou: Perhaps I like the memory associated with them more than the actual taste.

John: Interesting, do you think taste is more memory that people normally think, like the madeleine biscuit in Marcel Proust’s novel “Remembrance of things past”?

Lilou: Yeah. The same as with fears.

John: Fears are based in memory? Does that mean that a person can lose his or her fears if he or she deals with the memories associated with it?

Lilou: Of course. I believe you know that better than I do.

John: You may have a point there.

 
Categories: YAP