LANGUAGE CLASS – ÅÄÖ

 
 
 
Language class - ÅÄÖ
LANGUAGE CLASS – ÅÄÖ

John wants to educate the readers | Lilou doesn’t | They don’t educate the readers

John: I have been doing some research into the Polish alphabet lately. It is quite fascinating or harrowing depending on the level of your interest in learning the language. That made me think about some of our Swedish special letters, and I thought we could teach our readers a little about our mother tongue. The letters in question are Å, Ä and Ö. Do you feel enthusiastic enough to start?

Lilou: Where are you heading with this?

John: I am starting a little talk about the letters Å, Ä and Ö, to make our readers more acquainted with these, to better navigate when for example diving into the diverse and complex Swedish media. Or why not for reading August Strindberg or Astrid Lindgren?

Lilou: I can’t come to think of one beautiful word starting with Å, Ä or Ö in Swedish. “Älska” starts with Ä, but that word has been misused for so many years by so many people. I prefer action before words.

John: Uhm, okay. “Älska” means “love” and is a verb.

Lilou: Didn’t I just say it means love?

John: You missed that part.

Lilou: No I didn’t. You missed writing it down.

John: I think this is going to be a very tough language course.

Lilou: And a very short blog post, which is fine by me.

John: So far, our readers have not had the chance to even learn the pronunciation, less far any word including Å or Ö. Should we perhaps move on to those areas?

Lilou: They can check it out on YouTube.

John: You make this very hard, my dear. Let me just say that Å is pronounced like A in “war”, Ä is pronounced like A in “care”, Ö is pronounced like…

Lilou: Burt.

John: Burt? Yes… U in Burt. Yep.

Lilou: Burt is an ugly name by the way.

John: Okay, and right there we lost all readers called Burt.

Lilou: Sorry Burts. I love you even though you have ugly names.

John: It hurts Burts.

Lilou: I’m starting to like Burt the more we talk about the name. Or is it because I don’t wanna lose readers?

 

John wants to educate the readers | Lilou doesn’t | They don’t educate the readers

John: I have been doing some research into the Polish alphabet lately. It is quite fascinating or harrowing depending on the level of your interest in learning the language. That made me think about some of our Swedish special letters, and I thought we could teach our readers a little about our mother tongue. The letters in question are Å, Ä and Ö. Do you feel enthusiastic enough to start?

Lilou: Where are you heading with this?

John: I am starting a little talk about the letters Å, Ä and Ö, to make our readers more acquainted with these, to better navigate when for example diving into the diverse and complex Swedish media. Or why not for reading August Strindberg or Astrid Lindgren?

Lilou: I can’t come to think of one beautiful word starting with Å, Ä or Ö in Swedish. “Älska” starts with Ä, but that word has been misused for so many years by so many people. I prefer action before words.

John: Uhm, okay. “Älska” means “love” and is a verb.

Lilou: Didn’t I just say it means love?

John: You missed that part.

Lilou: No I didn’t. You missed writing it down.

John: I think this is going to be a very tough language course.

Lilou: And a very short blog post, which is fine by me.

John: So far, our readers have not had the chance to even learn the pronunciation, less far any word including Å or Ö. Should we perhaps move on to those areas?

Lilou: They can check it out on YouTube.

John: You make this very hard, my dear. Let me just say that Å is pronounced like A in “war”, Ä is pronounced like A in “care”, Ö is pronounced like…

Lilou: Burt.

John: Burt? Yes… U in Burt. Yep.

Lilou: Burt is an ugly name by the way.

John: Okay, and right there we lost all readers called Burt.

Lilou: Sorry Burts. I love you even though you have ugly names.

John: It hurts Burts.

Lilou: I’m starting to like Burt the more we talk about the name. Or is it because I don’t wanna lose readers?